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Centred counselling for by sawzag mearns essay

Using the person centred way, it is the counsellor’s ob to assist the client match their own internal resources enabling them to get their own unique alternatives. In this publication the authors undertake to describe the ideas and principles of person centred coaching by relating them to real practice. The book is intended as a practical and thorough guide to get trainee counsellors, those schooling them and in addition for set up counsellors wanting to familiarise themselves with the person centred method of counselling.

Coming from the viewpoint of someone Only starting out as a student counsellor, the writer as first captivated by the brief, snappy subject of ‘Person Centred Coaching in Action’. The word ‘action’ hints that the work will not be a dry, difficult to read book focusing only for the theoretical side but the target audience will actually view how the process works in practice. In this regard, the book did not disappoint. -2- The main body of the publication explores in some depth, the conditions (known while the main conditions) of empathy, acceptance and justesse, which are important to the practice of the person- centred counsellor.

The final 3 chapters attract on one articular case study showing how the core conditions are being used in practice. These final chapters look at the encounter from both counsellor’s as well as the client’s perspective. The copy writer found the contents in the book to become written within a logical trend and in the key uses simple language. The writer experienced that the down to earth style of producing and avoidance of Lingo made the book more accessible than others of the same genre.

Also very useful is that since new principles are introduced, examples of the notion being discussed are highlighted in bins throughout the text message. This helped to reinforce the writer’s comprehension of ideas that are unfamiliar to her at this stage of her learning. One of the main topics of the publication is a great in-depth exploration of the three elements that make up precisely what is referred to face-to-face centred literature, as the ‘core conditions’. In the 1st chapter the book evidently states what these are as follows: “The creation of a development producing environment in a therapeutic relationship requires That the counsellor can: 1 ) e authentic or consonant 2 . otter unconditional confident regard and total acknowledgement -3- a few. feel and communicate a deep empathic understanding While this kind of statement pays to for clearness it is clear on reading further that these conditions are not easily achieved. They take commitment on the part of the counsellor to develop and maintain these attitudes and therefore are so significant, say the authors, that not just do they have profound implications intended for the counsellor’s professional practice but also for the counsellor’s lifestyle as a whole.

This thought makes the writer temporarily halt and reflect on how strong the main conditions will be and the phrases ‘life changing’ spring unbidden to mind. Though in practice, the core circumstances are nextricably linked, to get the purposes of this assessment the writer has decided to focus on the books hunt for acceptance or ‘unconditional great regard’. The authors talk about unconditional confident regard as being an attitude held by the counsellor and give this clear description: “Unconditional great regard is definitely the label provided to the fundamental attitude of the person-centred counsellor towards her consumer.

The counsellor who keeps this frame of mind deeply values the humankind of her client and it is not deflected in that valuing by any kind of particular consumer behaviours. The attitude manifests itself in the counsellor’s onsistent acceptance of and enduring warmth towards her client. It struck the writer that although this attitude of unconditional positive view can be viewed as remarkably commendable, this may also in practice, be difficult to obtain. The writer agrees with the -4_ authors’ opinion that unconditionality may not be guaranteed because of each counsellor being fallible, human and having personal limits.

The writer even so questions the authors’ affirmation that  the person centred counsellor is likely to be ‘less conditional’ than other people with whom the client can relate. The writer seems hat this really is a capturing generalisation of clients’ human relationships and may certainly not be the case. That said, the writer feels that the attitude of complete, utter, absolute, wholehearted positive view is one which every counsellor, irrespective of traditions, should actively seek to develop and maintain.

The authors pose the question “Why is complete, utter, absolute, wholehearted positive regard important?  In reply to this issue a picture is drawn of any client who have been raised to believe that it can be only simply by meeting conditions imposed about them by significant others they may have any benefit. By consistently having a demeanor of nconditional positive view and by valuing the client inside their own correct, irrespective of conditions imposed by others, the counsellor is definitely directly demanding the client’s long held beliefs about their self- really worth.

The experts describe the client as being in a negative, self-defeating cycle, not really expecting to become valued and relate to other folks by being self-protective or shielding. They may very well be displaying behaviours that drive other folks away including being wrongly aggressive, certainly not showing virtually any feelings or possibly withdrawing from any demanding social speak to. In traveling others aside, the lient’s belief that he is not worth or unlovable is sturdy. The creators explain that by having an frame of mind of complete, utter, absolute, wholehearted positive consider, the counsellor can gradually break into the client’s self- defeating pattern.

Once the pattern is broken, the client -5- no longer should be defensive for the counsellor. His fear minimizes and a place of trust and security is created where client seems able to explore what troubles him. The authors claim that not only does the client have been influenced to question circumstances ot worth imposed upon him and been helped to become fewer efensive but that for some reason the client will start to experience the counsellor’s attitude intended for himself and commence the Quest towards self-acceptance.

The article writer, though inexperience, agrees with the writers’ look at that the counsellor’s attitude of unconditional great regard may eventually have got dramatic results for your customer. The article writer also takes on board the authors’ guidance to bear this kind of dramatic result in mind, early on in the therapeutic process if the client can display a number of difficult, off-putting behaviours. There was several discussion by authors regarding ‘defensive’ consumers. They give samples of three customers with very different problems.

Mary an unkempt 45 yr old lady with poor personal hygiene who may be filled with self- loathing; Roger a hard-nosed 35 yr old, cut-throat organization man whom blames his wife for all their marital concerns and James a suspicious, angry 18 year old who have used most of his initially counselling session to verbally abuse the counsellor. It later became clear the three consumers had 4 things in keeping: 1 . All of them had a deep sadness, installment payments on your Felt deeply unloved, three or more. Did not appreciate themselves and 4.

Were all really vulnerable. The authors remember that although the consumers behaviours had been ery diverse their defensiveness was acting as a shield which repelled others and hid what kind of people they really had been. The -6- authors recommend that complete, utter, absolute, wholehearted positive respect means that the counsellor must not be put off simply by these behaviors but should continue to value the worth of the customer and eventually earn the right to receive access to what lies lurking behind the shield.

The article writer can imagine that it could occasionally be tough for the counsellor to simply accept their customer. The creators examine this issue in some depth and also provide practical actions for the counsellor to take when confronted with this situation. They advise the conscious use of empathy which will helps the counsellor to focus more around the client and less on her own negative thoughts towards the client. Using accord can also motivate the client to spread out up the cause the counsellor to question her earlier Reasoning.

The experts also claim that it would be necessary for the counsellor to explore the subject more fully in supervision. The dislike belongs to the counsellor, say the authors and is also therefore her responsibility to handle it but not blame the customer for her feelings. In the phase on absolute, wholehearted positive consider, the uthors go onto go over in some interesting depth other matters worthy of concern and analyze such as ‘Can the Client Agree to My Popularity? ‘Focus upon Warmth’, ‘Focus on Conditionality and ‘Accepting the Client who have loves you’. Unfortunately time does not permit the writer to talk about these issues any further. The writer found the whole publication very engaging and helpful and would recommend the newer copy to any person wanting to find out more on person-centred coaching. Its ‘hands on’ design is very understandable and gives many useful examples of the process for. In conclusion, it ‘does what it says for the tin’! (word count 1, 565)

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Category: Essay,

Topic: Absolute wholehearted, Absolute wholehearted positive,

Words: 1567

Published: 12.25.19

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